Traditional recipes

Traditional Scottish Stovies

Traditional Scottish Stovies

Peel and slice potatoes (making slices approximately 1/4 inches thick). Chop onions roughly (not diced or too small).

Mix the potatoes and onions together and season with salt and pepper. Put this mixture into a heavy saucepan with a little cold water in the bottom (maybe about 1/4 inch deep).

Cut up the sausages and arrange them on top of the potatoes. Put the lid on the pot and heat up slowly. Once heated through, set the heat on "low-medium" and cook for about 30 minutes.

Stovies are cooked by the "steaming" method, so you don't want to lift the pot lid more than necessary. We'd suggest opening maybe 2 or 3 times during the cooking process so that you can stir, or mix up, the ingredients — but make it quick!

As always when trying something new, there may be a bit of "trial and error" before you get your recipe to turn out to your liking.

Some people like them "juicy" (with some gravy); others (like us) prefer them "dry." It's all just personal taste.

Extra Tips:

You don't want the potatoes on the bottom to burn, so keep an eye on them and add a tiny bit more water if you think they're drying out too much.

You can add many different types of vegetables. Try carrots, turnip (or swede), peas, cauliflower... whatever you like, really!

Using stock or broth instead of plain water adds a little extra flavor.

If you're using leftover meat, you can also add a couple of tablespoons of the "dripping" (fat from the meat) and heat it up before adding the potatoes and onions. That way you can fry them a little first.

Any leftover stovies can be frozen, and they reheat well in the microwave.


Stovies

Stovies is traditionally a left over dish from the Sunday Roast, using the tatties, meat and dripping leftovers all thrown into one pot. The origins are said to come from a time when masters would give their servants the left over food from Sunday lunch. They would take this home or to their quarters and make a dish that could last them all week and was easy to cook.

Main Course

Desserts/Snacks

Nine grieving Aberdeen families, one dark secret. Can love triumph?

Group is the new emotionally raw psychological character-driven suspense romance by Scottish author C.G. Buswell

Eating in has a delicious goose fat stovies recipe which is ideal for the leftover goose fat from Christmas roast potatoes.

The National Trust for Scotland book The Scottish Kitchen by Christopher Trotter describes where the meal gets its name which is from the French word etuve which means to cook in its own juices. Other names include Stoved Potatoes.

It can be cooked on the hob or in the oven (gives a nice browned crispy coating). There are various Scottish stovies recipes depending on taste. The amount of stock used can vary and really depends on how moist you prefer the dish. Meat used varies from chicken, beef and lamb. Some people use tinned corned beef. The best I've ever tasted is at Mrs Bridges in Peterhead who use beef. It is best served with oatcakes. Below is my mum's, cooked the day after the Sunday Roast.

The book Scots Cooking: The Best Traditional and Contemporary Scottish Recipes by Sue Lawrence describes the English equivalent as being a dish called Pan Haggerty which is cooked in the North East of England. Pan Haggerty is slowly cooked in dripping in a deep covered frying pan and consists of sliced onions and potatoes and would traditionally be served on a Monday after the Sunday roast.


Stovies

Stovies is traditionally a left over dish from the Sunday Roast, using the tatties, meat and dripping leftovers all thrown into one pot. The origins are said to come from a time when masters would give their servants the left over food from Sunday lunch. They would take this home or to their quarters and make a dish that could last them all week and was easy to cook.

Main Course

Desserts/Snacks

Nine grieving Aberdeen families, one dark secret. Can love triumph?

Group is the new emotionally raw psychological character-driven suspense romance by Scottish author C.G. Buswell

Eating in has a delicious goose fat stovies recipe which is ideal for the leftover goose fat from Christmas roast potatoes.

The National Trust for Scotland book The Scottish Kitchen by Christopher Trotter describes where the meal gets its name which is from the French word etuve which means to cook in its own juices. Other names include Stoved Potatoes.

It can be cooked on the hob or in the oven (gives a nice browned crispy coating). There are various Scottish stovies recipes depending on taste. The amount of stock used can vary and really depends on how moist you prefer the dish. Meat used varies from chicken, beef and lamb. Some people use tinned corned beef. The best I've ever tasted is at Mrs Bridges in Peterhead who use beef. It is best served with oatcakes. Below is my mum's, cooked the day after the Sunday Roast.

The book Scots Cooking: The Best Traditional and Contemporary Scottish Recipes by Sue Lawrence describes the English equivalent as being a dish called Pan Haggerty which is cooked in the North East of England. Pan Haggerty is slowly cooked in dripping in a deep covered frying pan and consists of sliced onions and potatoes and would traditionally be served on a Monday after the Sunday roast.


Stovies

Stovies is traditionally a left over dish from the Sunday Roast, using the tatties, meat and dripping leftovers all thrown into one pot. The origins are said to come from a time when masters would give their servants the left over food from Sunday lunch. They would take this home or to their quarters and make a dish that could last them all week and was easy to cook.

Main Course

Desserts/Snacks

Nine grieving Aberdeen families, one dark secret. Can love triumph?

Group is the new emotionally raw psychological character-driven suspense romance by Scottish author C.G. Buswell

Eating in has a delicious goose fat stovies recipe which is ideal for the leftover goose fat from Christmas roast potatoes.

The National Trust for Scotland book The Scottish Kitchen by Christopher Trotter describes where the meal gets its name which is from the French word etuve which means to cook in its own juices. Other names include Stoved Potatoes.

It can be cooked on the hob or in the oven (gives a nice browned crispy coating). There are various Scottish stovies recipes depending on taste. The amount of stock used can vary and really depends on how moist you prefer the dish. Meat used varies from chicken, beef and lamb. Some people use tinned corned beef. The best I've ever tasted is at Mrs Bridges in Peterhead who use beef. It is best served with oatcakes. Below is my mum's, cooked the day after the Sunday Roast.

The book Scots Cooking: The Best Traditional and Contemporary Scottish Recipes by Sue Lawrence describes the English equivalent as being a dish called Pan Haggerty which is cooked in the North East of England. Pan Haggerty is slowly cooked in dripping in a deep covered frying pan and consists of sliced onions and potatoes and would traditionally be served on a Monday after the Sunday roast.


Stovies

Stovies is traditionally a left over dish from the Sunday Roast, using the tatties, meat and dripping leftovers all thrown into one pot. The origins are said to come from a time when masters would give their servants the left over food from Sunday lunch. They would take this home or to their quarters and make a dish that could last them all week and was easy to cook.

Main Course

Desserts/Snacks

Nine grieving Aberdeen families, one dark secret. Can love triumph?

Group is the new emotionally raw psychological character-driven suspense romance by Scottish author C.G. Buswell

Eating in has a delicious goose fat stovies recipe which is ideal for the leftover goose fat from Christmas roast potatoes.

The National Trust for Scotland book The Scottish Kitchen by Christopher Trotter describes where the meal gets its name which is from the French word etuve which means to cook in its own juices. Other names include Stoved Potatoes.

It can be cooked on the hob or in the oven (gives a nice browned crispy coating). There are various Scottish stovies recipes depending on taste. The amount of stock used can vary and really depends on how moist you prefer the dish. Meat used varies from chicken, beef and lamb. Some people use tinned corned beef. The best I've ever tasted is at Mrs Bridges in Peterhead who use beef. It is best served with oatcakes. Below is my mum's, cooked the day after the Sunday Roast.

The book Scots Cooking: The Best Traditional and Contemporary Scottish Recipes by Sue Lawrence describes the English equivalent as being a dish called Pan Haggerty which is cooked in the North East of England. Pan Haggerty is slowly cooked in dripping in a deep covered frying pan and consists of sliced onions and potatoes and would traditionally be served on a Monday after the Sunday roast.


Stovies

Stovies is traditionally a left over dish from the Sunday Roast, using the tatties, meat and dripping leftovers all thrown into one pot. The origins are said to come from a time when masters would give their servants the left over food from Sunday lunch. They would take this home or to their quarters and make a dish that could last them all week and was easy to cook.

Main Course

Desserts/Snacks

Nine grieving Aberdeen families, one dark secret. Can love triumph?

Group is the new emotionally raw psychological character-driven suspense romance by Scottish author C.G. Buswell

Eating in has a delicious goose fat stovies recipe which is ideal for the leftover goose fat from Christmas roast potatoes.

The National Trust for Scotland book The Scottish Kitchen by Christopher Trotter describes where the meal gets its name which is from the French word etuve which means to cook in its own juices. Other names include Stoved Potatoes.

It can be cooked on the hob or in the oven (gives a nice browned crispy coating). There are various Scottish stovies recipes depending on taste. The amount of stock used can vary and really depends on how moist you prefer the dish. Meat used varies from chicken, beef and lamb. Some people use tinned corned beef. The best I've ever tasted is at Mrs Bridges in Peterhead who use beef. It is best served with oatcakes. Below is my mum's, cooked the day after the Sunday Roast.

The book Scots Cooking: The Best Traditional and Contemporary Scottish Recipes by Sue Lawrence describes the English equivalent as being a dish called Pan Haggerty which is cooked in the North East of England. Pan Haggerty is slowly cooked in dripping in a deep covered frying pan and consists of sliced onions and potatoes and would traditionally be served on a Monday after the Sunday roast.


Stovies

Stovies is traditionally a left over dish from the Sunday Roast, using the tatties, meat and dripping leftovers all thrown into one pot. The origins are said to come from a time when masters would give their servants the left over food from Sunday lunch. They would take this home or to their quarters and make a dish that could last them all week and was easy to cook.

Main Course

Desserts/Snacks

Nine grieving Aberdeen families, one dark secret. Can love triumph?

Group is the new emotionally raw psychological character-driven suspense romance by Scottish author C.G. Buswell

Eating in has a delicious goose fat stovies recipe which is ideal for the leftover goose fat from Christmas roast potatoes.

The National Trust for Scotland book The Scottish Kitchen by Christopher Trotter describes where the meal gets its name which is from the French word etuve which means to cook in its own juices. Other names include Stoved Potatoes.

It can be cooked on the hob or in the oven (gives a nice browned crispy coating). There are various Scottish stovies recipes depending on taste. The amount of stock used can vary and really depends on how moist you prefer the dish. Meat used varies from chicken, beef and lamb. Some people use tinned corned beef. The best I've ever tasted is at Mrs Bridges in Peterhead who use beef. It is best served with oatcakes. Below is my mum's, cooked the day after the Sunday Roast.

The book Scots Cooking: The Best Traditional and Contemporary Scottish Recipes by Sue Lawrence describes the English equivalent as being a dish called Pan Haggerty which is cooked in the North East of England. Pan Haggerty is slowly cooked in dripping in a deep covered frying pan and consists of sliced onions and potatoes and would traditionally be served on a Monday after the Sunday roast.


Stovies

Stovies is traditionally a left over dish from the Sunday Roast, using the tatties, meat and dripping leftovers all thrown into one pot. The origins are said to come from a time when masters would give their servants the left over food from Sunday lunch. They would take this home or to their quarters and make a dish that could last them all week and was easy to cook.

Main Course

Desserts/Snacks

Nine grieving Aberdeen families, one dark secret. Can love triumph?

Group is the new emotionally raw psychological character-driven suspense romance by Scottish author C.G. Buswell

Eating in has a delicious goose fat stovies recipe which is ideal for the leftover goose fat from Christmas roast potatoes.

The National Trust for Scotland book The Scottish Kitchen by Christopher Trotter describes where the meal gets its name which is from the French word etuve which means to cook in its own juices. Other names include Stoved Potatoes.

It can be cooked on the hob or in the oven (gives a nice browned crispy coating). There are various Scottish stovies recipes depending on taste. The amount of stock used can vary and really depends on how moist you prefer the dish. Meat used varies from chicken, beef and lamb. Some people use tinned corned beef. The best I've ever tasted is at Mrs Bridges in Peterhead who use beef. It is best served with oatcakes. Below is my mum's, cooked the day after the Sunday Roast.

The book Scots Cooking: The Best Traditional and Contemporary Scottish Recipes by Sue Lawrence describes the English equivalent as being a dish called Pan Haggerty which is cooked in the North East of England. Pan Haggerty is slowly cooked in dripping in a deep covered frying pan and consists of sliced onions and potatoes and would traditionally be served on a Monday after the Sunday roast.


Stovies

Stovies is traditionally a left over dish from the Sunday Roast, using the tatties, meat and dripping leftovers all thrown into one pot. The origins are said to come from a time when masters would give their servants the left over food from Sunday lunch. They would take this home or to their quarters and make a dish that could last them all week and was easy to cook.

Main Course

Desserts/Snacks

Nine grieving Aberdeen families, one dark secret. Can love triumph?

Group is the new emotionally raw psychological character-driven suspense romance by Scottish author C.G. Buswell

Eating in has a delicious goose fat stovies recipe which is ideal for the leftover goose fat from Christmas roast potatoes.

The National Trust for Scotland book The Scottish Kitchen by Christopher Trotter describes where the meal gets its name which is from the French word etuve which means to cook in its own juices. Other names include Stoved Potatoes.

It can be cooked on the hob or in the oven (gives a nice browned crispy coating). There are various Scottish stovies recipes depending on taste. The amount of stock used can vary and really depends on how moist you prefer the dish. Meat used varies from chicken, beef and lamb. Some people use tinned corned beef. The best I've ever tasted is at Mrs Bridges in Peterhead who use beef. It is best served with oatcakes. Below is my mum's, cooked the day after the Sunday Roast.

The book Scots Cooking: The Best Traditional and Contemporary Scottish Recipes by Sue Lawrence describes the English equivalent as being a dish called Pan Haggerty which is cooked in the North East of England. Pan Haggerty is slowly cooked in dripping in a deep covered frying pan and consists of sliced onions and potatoes and would traditionally be served on a Monday after the Sunday roast.


Stovies

Stovies is traditionally a left over dish from the Sunday Roast, using the tatties, meat and dripping leftovers all thrown into one pot. The origins are said to come from a time when masters would give their servants the left over food from Sunday lunch. They would take this home or to their quarters and make a dish that could last them all week and was easy to cook.

Main Course

Desserts/Snacks

Nine grieving Aberdeen families, one dark secret. Can love triumph?

Group is the new emotionally raw psychological character-driven suspense romance by Scottish author C.G. Buswell

Eating in has a delicious goose fat stovies recipe which is ideal for the leftover goose fat from Christmas roast potatoes.

The National Trust for Scotland book The Scottish Kitchen by Christopher Trotter describes where the meal gets its name which is from the French word etuve which means to cook in its own juices. Other names include Stoved Potatoes.

It can be cooked on the hob or in the oven (gives a nice browned crispy coating). There are various Scottish stovies recipes depending on taste. The amount of stock used can vary and really depends on how moist you prefer the dish. Meat used varies from chicken, beef and lamb. Some people use tinned corned beef. The best I've ever tasted is at Mrs Bridges in Peterhead who use beef. It is best served with oatcakes. Below is my mum's, cooked the day after the Sunday Roast.

The book Scots Cooking: The Best Traditional and Contemporary Scottish Recipes by Sue Lawrence describes the English equivalent as being a dish called Pan Haggerty which is cooked in the North East of England. Pan Haggerty is slowly cooked in dripping in a deep covered frying pan and consists of sliced onions and potatoes and would traditionally be served on a Monday after the Sunday roast.


Stovies

Stovies is traditionally a left over dish from the Sunday Roast, using the tatties, meat and dripping leftovers all thrown into one pot. The origins are said to come from a time when masters would give their servants the left over food from Sunday lunch. They would take this home or to their quarters and make a dish that could last them all week and was easy to cook.

Main Course

Desserts/Snacks

Nine grieving Aberdeen families, one dark secret. Can love triumph?

Group is the new emotionally raw psychological character-driven suspense romance by Scottish author C.G. Buswell

Eating in has a delicious goose fat stovies recipe which is ideal for the leftover goose fat from Christmas roast potatoes.

The National Trust for Scotland book The Scottish Kitchen by Christopher Trotter describes where the meal gets its name which is from the French word etuve which means to cook in its own juices. Other names include Stoved Potatoes.

It can be cooked on the hob or in the oven (gives a nice browned crispy coating). There are various Scottish stovies recipes depending on taste. The amount of stock used can vary and really depends on how moist you prefer the dish. Meat used varies from chicken, beef and lamb. Some people use tinned corned beef. The best I've ever tasted is at Mrs Bridges in Peterhead who use beef. It is best served with oatcakes. Below is my mum's, cooked the day after the Sunday Roast.

The book Scots Cooking: The Best Traditional and Contemporary Scottish Recipes by Sue Lawrence describes the English equivalent as being a dish called Pan Haggerty which is cooked in the North East of England. Pan Haggerty is slowly cooked in dripping in a deep covered frying pan and consists of sliced onions and potatoes and would traditionally be served on a Monday after the Sunday roast.


Watch the video: How to Cook Stovies (January 2022).