Traditional recipes

Magic Mushrooms Found in Buckingham Palace Garden

Magic Mushrooms Found in Buckingham Palace Garden

Hallucinogenic mushrooms are growing at Buckingham Palace

Wikimedia/H. Krisp

Hallucinogenic mushrooms were found growing at Buckingham Palace.

It’s party time at Prince Harry’s house, because someone found a patch of very special, hallucinogenic mushrooms growing in Queen Elizabeth’s garden at Buckingham Palace.

According to NBC News, a patch of hallucinogenic mushrooms was actually discovered on the grounds at Buckingham Palace by celebrity gardener Alan Titchmarsh, who was at the palace with a camera crew to film a Christmas special about gardening for British broadcaster ITV. While filming his TV show, Titchmarsh laid eyes upon some red and white fly agaric mushrooms, which are a very pretty mushroom, but reportedly cause hallucinations in humans if parboiled and eaten.

“I won’t be eating any,” Titchmarsh said.

A Buckingham Palace spokesperson confirmed that there are hallucinogenic mushrooms growing in the Queen’s garden, but said they occur naturally and actually help some of the trees growing there.

"There are several hundred fungi species in the palace garden, including a small number of naturally occurring fly agaric mushrooms," said the spokesperson, who was presumably a bit tired of fielding telephone calls about whether or not Queen Elizabeth II was high on mushrooms.

The spokesperson went on to clarify that while there were many species of mushroom growing on the palace grounds, none of them were actually used in the palace kitchens or fed to the queen.


'Magic mushroom' found growing wild in Queen Elizabeth II's garden at Buckingham Palace

FILE - This is a Saturday, June 8, 2013 file photo members of Household Cavalry as they ride outside Buckingham Palace in central London. A mushroom with hallucinogenic properties has been found growing at Buckingham Palace but no one suspects Queen Elizabeth II of cultivating the magic mushroom. The Amanita muscaria was found growing wild in the extensive palace gardens during preparations for a television show. Palace officials said Friday Dec. 12, 2014 there are several hundred species of mushrooms growing in the palace gardens, including a number of naturally occurring Amanita muscaria. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis) (The Associated Press)

LONDON – A mushroom with hallucinogenic properties has been found growing at Buckingham Palace but no one suspects Queen Elizabeth II of cultivating the magic mushroom.

The Amanita muscaria was found growing wild in the extensive palace gardens during preparations for a television show.

The mushroom's hallucinogenic properties have long been known and it has commonly been used in rituals.

Palace officials said Friday there are several hundred species of mushrooms growing in the palace gardens, including a number of naturally occurring Amanita muscaria.

The mushroom can be beneficial to trees but can be poisonous to humans.

Officials say mushrooms from the garden are not used in the palace kitchens.


Hallucinogenic Mushrooms Found At Buckingham Palace

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. The Queen of Hearts would've cried, off with their heads at the discovery of magic mushrooms in the palace garden. Britain's Buckingham Palace was more subdued when a gardening expert spotted hallucinogenic fungi there. Bright red and speckled with white, the mushrooms do look a lot like Christmas cookies. Though the Royals won't be nibbling, a palace spokesperson said fungi from the garden are not used in the palace kitchens. It's MORNING EDITION.

Copyright © 2014 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR&rsquos programming is the audio record.


Experts Discovered ‘Magic’ Mushrooms Growing In Queen Elizabeth’s Garden At Buckingham Palace

Turns out that you don’t have to go out of your way to find psychedelic mushrooms if you’re walking around England, just go knock on the door at Buckingham Palace. The magic shrooms were found growing naturally in the Queen’s garden during filming of a Christmas special on the garden, prompting some questions from those on hand. From The Telegraph:

[Alan Titchmarsh] unearthed the fungi at Buckingham Palace for an ITV gardening show called The Queen’s Garden, and said: “I won’t be eating any of that.”

Titchmarsh came across the red and white spotted toadstool — called Amanita muscaria, or fly agaric — on a tour of the private 40-acre plot with ecology expert Professor Mick Crawley.

I think the truly funny bit comes from the history behind how the mushroom has been used across history. It’s a priceless bit that proves that some people will do almost anything to get a little high:

“The old-fashioned thing to do was to feed it to the village idiot, then drink his urine because you get all of the high without any of the sickness.”

Titchmarsh jokingly replies: “I think I’ll forgo that and stick to normal mushrooms.”

Then he adds: “Not something to try at home.” (via)

Now I’m sure you’ll all be dying to tune into a gardening show this Christmas, so I don’t have to spoil this for you. But for those who will be busy, you should know that Queen Elizabeth isn’t out there using magic mushrooms to get high. The mushrooms are left along for their nutrients and benefits to the other trees and plants in the garden.

The staff at the palace also made it clear that the shrooms are not used in the palace’s kitchen, even if that would be completely awesome. It’d certainly make those high tension evenings with her Corgis a lot more interesting. Squeegee that third eye, your Majesty.


‘Magic mushroom’ found growing in Queen’s garden at Buckingham Palace

View image in full screen
  • comments Leave a comment
  • facebook Share this item on Facebook
  • whatsapp Share this item via WhatsApp
  • twitter Share this item on Twitter
  • email Send this page to someone via email
  • more Share this item
  • more Share this item

LONDON – A mushroom with hallucinogenic properties was found growing at Buckingham Palace but no one suspects Queen Elizabeth II of cultivating the magic mushroom.

The Amanita muscaria was found growing wild in the extensive palace gardens during preparations for a television show.

The mushroom’s hallucinogenic properties have long been known and it has commonly been used in rituals.

Palace officials said Friday there are several hundred species of mushrooms growing in the palace gardens, including a number of naturally occurring Amanita muscaria.

The mushroom can be beneficial to trees but can be poisonous to humans.

Officials say mushrooms from the garden are not used in the palace kitchens.


Sponsored

He came across the Amanita muscaria, commonly known as fly agaric or fly mushroom, on a tour of the 40 acre grounds with Professor Mick Crawley, an ecology expert.

The discovery was recorded for the ITV show The Queen’s Garden, which will be broadcast on Christmas Day, according to The Sun.

In the programme Mr Titchmarsh turns to his colleague and asks: “Is it edible?”

Professor Crawley replies: “That depends what you mean. It’s eaten in some cultures for its hallucinogenic effects. But it also makes people who eat it


Magic mushrooms discovered in Buckingham Palace gardens

RT reports: Presenter and celebrity gardener Alan Titchmarsh said he found the hallucinogenic mushrooms nestling in the palace grounds. He was filming ‘The Queen’s Garden’ for ITV, set to be screened this Christmas.

“That was a surprise but it shows just how varied the species are,” Titchmarsh told the Sun. “I won’t be eating any of that,” he added.

The red and white-headed toadstool is thought to have grown naturally in the palace grounds.

This type of fungi is not a popular type for recreational use because of its depressant qualities. Much smaller psilocybin mushrooms are the ones people pick and use for their hallucinogenic properties.

A Buckingham Palace spokesperson said: “There are several hundred fungi species in the palace garden, including a small number of naturally occurring fly agaric mushrooms.

“As the program explains, they are beneficial to trees, increasing their ability to take in nutrients.”

The mushrooms also provide food for flies and a breeding site for beetles, but are considered harmful to humans.

The Buckingham Palace spokesman also told the Sun: “For the avoidance of doubt, fungi from the garden are not used in the palace kitchens.”


Hallucinogenic Magic Mushrooms Found in Buckingham Palace Private Gardens

Psychoactive “fly agaric” mushrooms have been found growing in the private gardens of Buckingham Palace.

MOSCOW, December 13 (Sputnik) &ndash A psychoactive basidiomycete fungus, more commonly known as fly agaric, has been discovered growing in the private gardens of Buckingham Palace, The Independent reported on Saturday.

The discovery was made by English gardener and broadcaster Alan Titchmarsh and ecology expert Professor Mick Crawley while filming The Queen&rsquos Garden, a TV show, in the royal gardens for the television network ITV.

The mushrooms are likely to have grown on the land without being specifically cultivated.

When asked if the mushrooms are edible, Professor Mick Crawley responded: &ldquoThat depends what you mean. It&rsquos eaten in some cultures for its hallucinogenic effects. But it also makes people who eat it very sick.&rdquo

&ldquoThe old-fashioned thing to do was feed it to the village idiot, then drink his urine because you get all the high without any of the sickness,&rdquo he added.

The show is set to be aired on Christmas Day, which has also been affected by legends surrounding the hallucinogen. According to the website Askmen.com, Laplanders would drink the pee of reindeer that had ingested the mushrooms. &ldquoUnder the hallucinogenic effects of reindeer piss, the Sami thought their reindeer were flying through space, looking down on the world. When the first missionaries reached Lapland, they heard stories of flying reindeer and integrated them in the existing Christmas folklore of Western cultures&rdquo, the website explains.

Although fly agaric mushrooms are generally considered poisonous, reports of human deaths resulting from eating the mushroom are extremely rare.

It provides food for flies and a breeding site for beetles, and was supposedly also used as an intoxicant and entheogen by the peoples of Siberia.

Related:

All comments

In reply to (Show commentHide comment)
Recommended
Multimedia

Trending

Hello, !

Hello, !

Hello, !

The fact of registration and authorization of users on Sputnik websites via users’ account or accounts on social networks indicates acceptance of these rules.

Users are obliged abide by national and international laws. Users are obliged to speak respectfully to the other participants in the discussion, readers and individuals referenced in the posts.

The websites’ administration has the right to delete comments made in languages ​​other than the language of the majority of the websites’ content.

In all language versions of the sputniknews.com websites any comments posted can be edited.

A user comment will be deleted if it:

  • does not correspond with the subject of the post
  • promotes hatred and discrimination on racial, ethnic, sexual, religious or social basis or violates the rights of minorities
  • violates the rights of minors, causing them harm in any form, including moral damage
  • contains ideas of extremist nature or calls for other illegal activities
  • contains insults, threats to other users, individuals or specific organizations, denigrates dignity or undermines business reputations
  • contains insults or messages expressing disrespect to Sputnik
  • violates privacy, distributes personal data of third parties without their consent or violates privacy of correspondence
  • describes or references scenes of violence, cruelty to animals
  • contains information about methods of suicide, incites to commit suicide
  • pursues commercial objectives, contains improper advertising, unlawful political advertisement or links to other online resources containing such information
  • promotes products or services of third parties without proper authorization
  • contains offensive language or profanity and its derivatives, as well as hints of the use of lexical items falling within this definition
  • contains spam, advertises spamming, mass mailing services and promotes get-rich-quick schemes
  • promotes the use of narcotic / psychotropic substances, provides information on their production and use
  • contains links to viruses and malicious software
  • is part of an organized action involving large volumes of comments with identical or similar content ("flash mob")
  • “floods” the discussion thread with a large number of incoherent or irrelevant messages
  • violates etiquette, exhibiting any form of aggressive, humiliating or abusive behavior ("trolling")
  • doesn’t follow standard rules of the English language, for example, is typed fully or mostly in capital letters or isn’t broken down into sentences.

The administration has the right to block a user’s access to the page or delete a user’s account without notice if the user is in violation of these rules or if behavior indicating said violation is detected.

Users can initiate the recovery of their account / unlock access by contacting the moderators at [email protected]

  • Subject - the restoration of account / unlock access
  • User ID
  • An explanation of the actions which were in violation of the rules above and resulted in the lock.

If the moderators deem it possible to restore the account / unlock access, it will be done.

In the case of repeated violations of the rules above resulting in a second block of a user’s account, access cannot be restored.


Quirky World. Her Highness has magic mushrooms in her garden

ENGLAND: A species of magic mushroom has been discovered growing in the grounds of Buckingham Palace.

The Amanita muscaria, commonly known as fly agaric or fly mushroom, was found during a walkabout of the private gardens for a television show to be screened on Christmas Day.

Television presenter Alan Titchmarsh told The Sun he was surprised to happen upon the red and white-headed toadstool, which has hallucinogenic properties.

“That was a surprise but it shows just how varied the species are,” said Titchmarsh, presenter of The Queen’s Garden.

Fly agaric are common and are understood to have grown naturally in the palace grounds rather than having been planted there.

The hallucinogenic properties of the mushroom have been well-known for centuries and have a long history of use in religious and shamanistic rituals, according to the Kew Gardens website.

The fungi is also important to the growth and development of many types of tree, and provides food for flies, and a breeding site for beetles.

A Buckingham Palace spokesman told the tabloid: “For the avoidance of doubt, fungi from the garden are not used in the palace kitchens.”

The drug contains poison which, although rare, can cause death if consumed.

Thousands of crows roosting at night in a US city centre have prompted residents to compare the landscape to Alfred Hitchcock movie The Birds as they work to drive away the flocks.

The crows troubling Springfield, Ohio, are not aggressive like the killer birds in the 1963 thriller.

However, with up to 50,000 of them, their overwhelming presence on trees, buildings, and other perches is causing concern about damage to buildings and potential health hazards from the birds’ waste.

Businesses and city workers are using noise devices and laser pointers among other deterrents in an attempt to scare off the birds. Clark County Historical Society said removing the droppings left at the county’s Heritage Centre and other buildings was also costly for property owners.

Wielding toy guns, a 12-year-old boy and his 13-year-old accomplice tried to rob a bank in Israel but fled without any cash after apparently losing their nerve, police said.

Security footage showed the boys, wearing hooded sweatshirts, entering the bank in Rishon Lezion, a Tel Aviv suburb. One had a schoolbag on his back and what seemed to be a rifle in his hand. Police spokesman Micky Rosenfeld said both were carrying fake M-16 assault rifles and that they shouted: “This is a holdup.”

“They were toy guns but they looked real,” said Rosenfeld. “The people in the bank were scared, but then the suspects ran out without taking any money.”

Police were able to identify the pair from security footage and later arrested them.

A US brewery has constructed a Christmas tree out of hundreds of beer kegs. All that is missing is the beer.

The Genesee Brewing Co built the 7m Christmas tree out of 300 stainless steel kegs outsides its Brew House in downtown Rochester, western New York.

The keg tree is trimmed with 183m of green lights and topped by a rotating Genesee sign.

More than 20 of Genesee’s elves — also known as employees — got to work designing and building the keg tree. Alas, beer lovers, the kegs are empty. But the company says that when the tree is dismantled the kegs will return to the production line and be refilled.


One is not amused! Magic mushrooms found at Buckingham Palace by Alan Titchmarsh

MAGIC MUSHROOMS have been found growing in the Queen's garden at Buckingham Palace.

The Amanita muscaria, commonly known as fly agaric or fly mushroom, was found by Alan Titchmarsh as he walked around Her Maj&aposs private gardens.

Titchmarsh told The Sun he stumbled upon the freaky fungi as he filmed The Queen&aposs Garden, a special TV programme to be aired on Christmas Day.

"That was a surprise but it shows just how varied the species are," he said.

"I won&apost be eating any of that, though, no. My idea of hard drugs in Nurofen."

Amanita muscaria contains poison which can cause death if consumed.

According to the Kew Gardens website, the properties of the mushrooms have been known for centuries.

They have a long history of use in religious rituals.

When consumed magic mushrooms can distort people&aposs eyesight and cause hallucinations.

A Buckingham Palace spokesperson said: "There are several hundred fungi species in the palace garden, including a small number of naturally occurring fly agaric mushrooms.

"As the programme explains, they are beneficial to trees, increasing their ability to take in nutrients."

Royal officials made clear that mushrooms from the garden are not used in the palace kitchens.


Watch the video: Buckingham Palace Suffers Security Blunder (January 2022).