Traditional recipes

Viennese potato salad recipe

Viennese potato salad recipe

  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Salad
  • Salad dressing
  • Mayonnaise

In Austria this mayonnaise based potato salad is prepared with a long narrow potato variety called Kipfler which holds its shape during cooking. You can use salad potatoes instead.

2 people made this

IngredientsServes: 6

  • 1kg salad potatoes
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 2 teaspoon mustard
  • 250ml vegetable oil
  • 1 apple cider vinegar
  • 1 small onion
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 dash apple cider vinegar

MethodPrep:40min ›Cook:15min ›Extra time:1hr › Ready in:1hr55min

  1. Cook potatoes in their skins. Let cool slightly then peel and cut into 2mm slices.
  2. In a small bowl whisk egg yolk and mustard til smooth. Slowly add the oil, a drizzle at first, while beating constantly. Once it has emulsified you can add it in a thin stream but keep beating. At the end stir in the vinegar.
  3. Peel onion, quarter and cut paper thin. Add to the potatoes and pour over the dressing. Season with salt, sugar and a dash of vinegar. Gently toss to combine.
  4. Let marinate for 30 to 60 before serving. Add a dash of vinegar just before serving if desired.

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Viennese-style Potato Field Salad

This potato salad is typical for Vienna. It is light, refreshing and slightly tangy and therefore the perfect side dish for Viennese Schnitzel.

While many potato salads are dressed with a mayo sauce, this one uses a slightly tangy, light vinaigrette instead – typical for Austrian salads. The potatoes will soak up the dressing and melt in your mouth, while the field salad (lamb’s lettuce) provides a leafy, fresh element.

By the way, I have already posted a slightly different traditional Austrian potato salad on the blog. Although this previously posted salad takes a little longer to make since it consists of a vinegar base and is flavored with onions, broth, and mustard. However, it is one of my favorite salads as well.


Notes about this recipe

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Notes about this recipe

Member Rating

Categories

Where’s the full recipe - why can I only see the ingredients?

At Eat Your Books we love great recipes – and the best come from chefs, authors and bloggers who have spent time developing and testing them.

We’ve helped you locate this recipe but for the full instructions you need to go to its original source.

If the recipe is available online - click the link “View complete recipe”– if not, you do need to own the cookbook or magazine.


Recipe Summary

  • 1 1/2 pounds fingerling potatoes
  • Kosher salt
  • Pepper
  • 1/3 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped dill, plus sprigs for garnish
  • 1 tablespoon whole-grain mustard
  • 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons canola oil, plus more for frying
  • 1 English cucumber, halved lengthwise and sliced 1/4 inch thick
  • 1/3 cup minced red onion
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 2 large eggs, beaten
  • 1 1/2 cups plain dry breadcrumbs
  • Four 5-ounce veal cutlets, pounded 1/4 inch thick
  • Lemon wedges

In a large saucepan, cover the potatoes with cold water and bring to a boil. Add a generous pinch of salt and ­simmer until tender, 15 to 20 minutes. Drain and let cool, then halve lengthwise.

In a large bowl, whisk the vinegar with the chopped dill and mustard. Gradually whisk in the 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons of oil. Add the potatoes, cucumber and red onion and toss to coat.

Put the flour, beaten eggs and breadcrumbs in 3 separate shallow bowls. Season the veal cutlets with salt and pepper, then dredge in the flour and shake off the excess. Dip the cutlets in the eggs, then gently dredge in the breadcrumbs.

In a large skillet, heat 1/4 inch of oil until shimmering. Add half of the veal cutlets in a single layer and cook over moderately high heat, turning once, until golden brown and crisp, about 5 minutes total. Transfer the schnitzels to a paper towel&ndashlined plate to drain and sprinkle with salt transfer to a platter. Repeat with the remaining veal. Garnish the schnitzels with dill sprigs and serve with the potato-cucumber salad and lemon wedges.


Recipe Summary

  • 12 red potatoes, each cut into 6 pieces
  • ½ cup chopped bacon ends, visible fat trimmed
  • ¼ cup white vinegar
  • ¼ cup cider vinegar
  • ¼ cup white sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper
  • ½ cup light sour cream
  • ¼ cup mayonnaise
  • 1 small red onion, diced
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh chives

Place potatoes into a large pot and cover with water bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer until pierced easily with a fork, about 10 minutes. Drain and cool.

Place the bacon in a large, deep skillet and cook over medium-high heat, turning occasionally, until evenly browned, about 10 minutes. Drain and transfer bacon to a paper towel-lined plate to cool.

Stir white vinegar, cider vinegar, sugar, salt, and black pepper together in the same skillet bring to a boil and remove from heat to cool completely. Whisk sour cream and mayonnaise into cooled vinegar mixture until dressing is thick and creamy.

Mix potatoes, dressing, onion, parsley, and chives together in a bowl. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate until chilled, at least 2 hours. Stir bacon into potato salad just before serving.


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Ingredients:

  • 1,5 l (1 qt) beef stock
  • 300 g (0,7 lv) potatoes
  • 100 g (1/4 lb) fresh mushrooms (porcini, chanterelle, etc.)
  • 50 g (1/8 lb) bacon
  • 50 g (1/8 lb) onion (chopped)
  • 120 g (1/4 lb) root vegetables (carrots, turnips, parsnips)
  • 4 tbsps butter
  • 1 tbsp flour
  • 125 ml (0,2 pt) cream
  • 1 bay leaf
  • marjoram
  • caraway seeds (ground)
  • 1-2 cloves of garlic (crushed)
  • ground pepper
  • salt
  • dash of white wine
  • chives

Viennese potato salad recipe - Recipes

Viennese potato salad,
as Figlmüller restaurant

The restaurant Figlmüller, in Vienna, is known by the 1905 for its huge and excellent Wienerschnitzel, The cutlets breaded elephant ear of the Viennese manner (But that has nothing to share with the wonderful Wiener schnitzel . ) as well as the equally known Erdäpfelsalat: The potato salad that's where the classic accompaniment.

With its own special touch, like any self-respecting potato salad.

He could not miss a Manual cooking which present all the recipes, including the potato salad.
Recipe that I promptly applied, with minimal changes, and added to my collection of potato salad.
It looked just like the one experienced in Vienna years ago!

I just have to share the preparation.

The given ingredients are indicated for a light outline for two people.
Modify them in proportion according to the quantity and the appetite of diners.


Viennese Cabbage Rolls and Potato Salad

The other night, I was in the mood for something warm, hearty and filling for dinner. I needed a comfort meal that wasn’t too crazy-elaborate to assemble. I was also craving meat in a big way. What can I say, it happens.

I flipped through a few of my favorite stand-by cookbooks for something to jump out at me, and when none of the usual suspects provided me with the inspiration I was looking for, I turned to my copy of Plachutta: The Best of Viennese Cooking.

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Comments

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I think I know what’s on this week’s dinner menu!

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